• Increasing Your Range - 5 Easy Tips!

    The key issue that interferes with a wider vocal range is the engagement of the throat and neck muscles around the larynx. These exterior muscles are strong and can pull your larynx up as you move to higher pitches. However, the key to effortless singing is to keep these muscles relaxed so that the vocal chords, housed inside your larynx, are free to adjust forwards and backwards to your desired pitches.

    Here are 5 Easy Tips to help you keep the muscles around your larynx relaxed and therefore increase your range.

    1. Try bending your knees as you approach higher notes. This will help the mind focus on going down and helps release these muscles.

    2. From there, take it a step further and bend over from the waist, looking toward your toes as if you are going to pick the high note up off the floor. Keep your torso flat so you are not curling your body.

    3. Imagine pitch moving forwards and backwards. Your vocal chords adjust forwards and backwards on a horizontal plane so this will help you mentally stay in alignment with what your physiology is doing. When you feel pitch move up and down, what you are actually feeling is the vibration or resonance of the pitch moving up and down.

    4. Speak the lyrics of your song first, then sing them. This will give your body the opportunity to feel how the words move your breath and mouth before adding pitch. This can make a huge difference right away. Then when you start to sing again try to continue to maintain the feeling of speaking, but now you are speaking on pitch.

    5. Focus on the story. What is your song about? Who are you talking to in the song? What are the emotions and what do you need from the other person? Once you have done the other 4 tips, give this one a try. By taking your mind's focus off the technical aspect of singing and onto the story you will be more connected to the song, more relaxed, and your voice will release more easily and naturally.

    I hope you enjoy trying all of these!

    Author: Tammy Frederick


  • Breathing for Singing Made Simple

    There seems to be a lot of confusion about breathing when it comes to singing. Really all we are looking for is that the breath is allowed to fill into the lungs and exhale in a steady manner. It is actually detrimental to take in too much air before you sing a phrase in a song. If you ever have it that the voice sounds shaky especially as you descend in pitch, it is very often because you simply have taken in too much air that now has to find release.

    Try taking in a normal amount of air as if you were in a conversation. No doubt some phrases in a song or a phrase that includes a long sustained note will require more air intake, but the majority of your phrasing will be quite normal. 

    The key in singing is to focus on the exhale, not so much on the inhalation. Your body will breathe in automatically and so focus on breathing out as you sing, easily releasing your air in a steady stream.

    The best best best tool for this is to sing with Liprolls (motor boat sound with your lips) or Tongue Trills (rolling the front of your tongue). Sing all your favourite songs with a liproll or tongue trill and you will guarantee that you are singing with a consistent steady stream of air. In order for the lips or tongue to keep moving, you must be exhaling a steady stream of air which will quickly develop this muscle memory in your songs. It will also serve to keep the facial and throat muscles relaxed, which is ideal for singing.

    Basic Breathing:
    Place one hand on your belly, just above your belly button. When you breathe in allow your belly to move FORWARD. As you exhale the belly will fall back. This is the action of your diaphragm contracting downward as you breathe in moving your organs slightly forward and as you exhale the diaphragm relaxes. The action downward allows your lungs to fully expand. Try to keep inhalations relaxed and full with tongue relaxed. If you are struggling with this watch someone breathe as they sleep, their belly will rise and fall with each breath. Or lay on the floor with your feet up on a chair, relax, and watch your belly rise and fall. Try to continue this easy breathing as you sing and speak.

     Author: Tammy Frederick



Website Created & Hosted by Doteasy Web Hosting Canada